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Nonfiction

"all Labor Has Dignity"

"all Labor Has Dignity"

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An unprecedented and timely collection of Dr. King's speeches on labor rights and economic justice

Covering all the civil rights movement highlights--Montgomery, Albany, Birmingham, Selma, Chicago, and Memphis--award-winning historian Michael K. Honey introduces and traces Dr. King's dream of economic equality. Gathered in one volume for the first time, the majority of these speeches will be new to most readers. The collection begins with King's lectures to unions in the 1960s and includes his addresses made during his Poor People's Campaign, culminating with his momentous Mountaintop speech, delivered in support of striking black sanitation workers in Memphis. Unprecedented and timely, All Labor Has Dignity will more fully restore our understanding of King's lasting vision of economic justice, bringing his demand for equality right into the present.

#futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country

#futuregen: Lessons from a Small Country

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What Wales is doing today, the world will do tomorrow."--Nikhil Seth, UN Assistant Secretary General

The story of how one small nation responded to global climate issues by radically rethinking public policy for future generations

In #futuregen, Jane Davidson explains how, as Minister for Environment, Sustainability and Housing in Wales, she proposed the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015--the first piece of legislation on Earth to place regenerative and sustainable practice at the heart of government. Unparalleled in its scope and vision, the Act connects environmental and social health and looks to solve complex issues such as poverty, education and unemployment.

Davidson reveals how and why such groundbreaking legislation was forged in Wales--once reliant on its coal, iron and steel industries--and explores how the shift from economic growth to sustainable growth is creating new opportunities for communities and governments all over the world.

#futuregen is the inspiring story of a small, pioneering nation discovering prosperity through its vast natural beauty, renewable energy resources and resilient communities. It's a living, breathing prototype for local and global leaders as proof of what is possible in the fight for a sustainable future.

$11 Billion Year

$11 Billion Year

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This chronicle of 2012 is a slice of what happened during a watershed year for the Hollywood movie industry. It's not the whole story, but it's a mosaic of what went on, and why, and of where things are heading.

What changed in one Hollywood year to produce a record-breaking box office after two years of decline? How can the Sundance Festival influence a film's fate, as it did for Beasts of the Southern Wild and Searching for Sugar Man, which both went all the way to the Oscars? Why did John Carter misfire and The Hunger Games succeed? How did maneuvers at festivals such as South by Southwest (SXSW), Cannes, Telluride, Toronto, and New York and at conventions such as CinemaCon and Comic-Con benefit Amour, Django Unchained, Moonrise Kingdom, Silver Linings Playbook, Les Misérables, The Life of Pi, The Avengers, Lincoln, and Argo? What jeopardized Zero Dark Thirty's launch? What role does gender bias still play in the industry? What are the ten things that changed the 2012 Oscar race?

When it comes to film, Anne Thompson, a seasoned reporter and critic, addresses these questions and more on her respected daily blog, Thompson on Hollywood. Each year, she observes the Hollywood machine at work: the indies at Sundance, the exhibitors' jockeying at CinemaCon, the international scene at Cannes, the summer tentpoles, the fall's smart films and festivals, the family-friendly and big films of the holiday season, and the glamour of the Oscars(R). Inspired by William Goldman's classic book The Season, which examined the overall Broadway scene through a production-by-production analysis of one theatrical season, Thompson had long wanted to apply a similar lens to the movie business. When she chose 2012 as the year to track, she knew that box-office and DVD sales were declining, production costs were soaring, and the digital revolution was making big waves, but she had no idea that events would converge to bring radical structural movement, record-setting box-office revenues, and what she calls sublime moviemaking.

Though impossible to mention all 670-plus films released in 2012, Thompson includes many in this book, while focusing on the nine Best Picture nominees and the personalities and powers behind them. Reflecting on the year, Thompson concludes, The best movies get made because filmmakers, financiers, champions, and a great many gifted creative people stubbornly ignore the obstacles. The question going forward is how adaptive these people are, and how flexible is the industry itself?

$2 a Day

$2 a Day

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A New York Times Notable Book of the Year
The story of a kind of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don't even think exists -- from a leading national poverty expert who "defies convention." (The New York Times)
Jessica Compton's family of four would have no income if she didn't donate plasma twice a week at her local donation center in Tennessee. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter, Brianna, in Chicago, often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends.
After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn't seen before -- households surviving on virtually no cash income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, was one and a half million households, including about three million children. Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor?
Through this book's eye-opening analysis and many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge. $2.00 a Day delivers provocative ideas to our national debate on income inequality.
"Powerful . . . Presents a deeply moving human face that brings the stunning numbers to life. It is an explosive book . . . The stories will make you angry and break your heart." -- American Prospect
"Harrowing . . . [An] important and heart-rending book, in the tradition of Michael Harrington's The Other America." -- Los Angeles Times





$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America

$28.00
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A revelatory account of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don't think it exists

Jessica Compton's family of four would have no cash income unless she donated plasma twice a week at her local donation center in Tennessee. Modonna Harris and her teenage daughter Brianna in Chicago often have no food but spoiled milk on weekends. After two decades of brilliant research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn't seen since the mid-1990s -- households surviving on virtually no income. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on calculating incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children. Where do these families live? How did they get so desperately poor? Edin has "turned sociology upside down" (Mother Jones) with her procurement of rich -- and truthful -- interviews. Through the book's many compelling profiles, moving and startling answers emerge. The authors illuminate a troubling trend: a low-wage labor market that increasingly fails to deliver a living wage, and a growing but hidden landscape of survival strategies among America's extreme poor. More than a powerful exposé, $2.00 a Day delivers new evidence and new ideas to our national debate on income inequality.
$20 Per Gallon: How the Rising Cost of Gasoline WIll Radically Change Our Lives

$20 Per Gallon: How the Rising Cost of Gasoline WIll Radically Change Our Lives

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The price of petrol has already impacted our choice of cars but there are more, not-so-obvious changes on the horizon. Steiner, an engineer by training, sees how a simple but constant rise in oil and related prices will restructure our lifestyle. But what may surprise readers is that all of these changes may not be negative.
(Dis)placement

(Dis)placement

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(Dis)placement is a constellation of portraits of displaced people--immigrants, refugees, and their families--leaving their communities to cross the southern border of the United States. These poems have a dark and haunting light that emanates from each of their cores. They lift off the page and consume the reader in their deceptively neat line-lengths and rhythms, entrancing with every image.

In (Dis)placement, Rodriguez explores the hazardous journeys across borders and landscapes many are forced to undertake when violence, destruction, and the constant fear of death are subjected upon a land and people. His language is evocative and lyrical, and challenges the reader to confront the reality of suffering, (Dis)placement unveils the harm inflicted upon bodies and terrains, and documents the will to survive in the face of hopelessness and loss.

In the lineage of Eduardo Corral and Natalie Scenters-Zapico, Rodriguez depicts the border landscape with chilling atmosphere and the undeniable struggle of those attempting to cross it evokes deep empathy and horror at the injustices perpetrated against them.

10 Books that Screwed Up the World

10 Books that Screwed Up the World

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You've heard of the "Great Books"? These are their evil opposites.

From Machiavelli's The Prince to Alfred Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, from Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto to Margaret Mead's Coming of Age in Samoa, these "influential" books have led to war, genocide, totalitarian oppression, the breakdown of the family, and disastrous social experiments.

And yet the toxic ideas peddled in these books are more popular and pervasive than ever. In fact, they might influence your own thinking without your realizing it.

Fortunately, Professor Benjamin Wiker is ready with an antidote, exposing the beguiling errors in each of these evil books.

Witty, learned, and provocative, 10 Books That Screwed Up the World provides a quick education in the worst ideas in human history and explains how we can avoid them in the future.

100 Essays I Dont Have Time to Write

100 Essays I Dont Have Time to Write

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100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write is an incisive, idiosyncratic collection on life and theater from major American playwright Sarah Ruhl.

This is a book in which chimpanzees, Chekhov, and child care are equally at home. A vibrant, provocative examination of the possibilities of the theater, it is also a map to a very particular artistic sensibility, and an unexpected guide for anyone who has chosen an artist's life.

Sarah Ruhl is a mother of three and one of America's best-known playwrights. She has written a stunningly original book of essays whose concerns range from the most minimal and personal subjects to the most encompassing matters of art and culture. The titles themselves speak to the volume's uniqueness: On lice, On sleeping in the theater, On motherhood and stools (the furniture kind), Greek masks and Bell's palsy.

100 Essays I Dont Have Time to Write

100 Essays I Dont Have Time to Write

$25.00
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Sarah Ruhl is a mother of three and one of America's best-known playwrights. She has written a stunningly original book of essays whose concerns range from the most minimal and personal subjects to the most encompassing matters of art and culture. The titles themselves speak to the volume's uniqueness: "On lice," "On sleeping in the theater," "On motherhood and stools (the furniture kind)," "Greek masks and Bell's palsy."

100 Essays I Don't Have Time to Write is a book in which chimpanzees, Chekhov, and child care are equally at home. A vibrant, provocative examination of the possibilities of the theater, it is also a map to a very particular artistic sensibility, and an unexpected guide for anyone who has chosen an artist's life.

100 Heartbeats: A Journey to Meet Our Planet's Endangered Animals and the Heroes

100 Heartbeats: A Journey to Meet Our Planet's Endangered Animals and the Heroes

$24.99
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It's no secret that our planet--and the delicate web of ecosystems that comprise it--is in crisis. Environmental threats such as climate change, pollution, habitat loss, and land degradation threaten the survival of thousands of plant and animal species each day. In 100 Heartbeats, conservationist and television host Jeff Corwin provides an urgent, palpable portrait of the wildlife that is suffering in silence and teetering on the brink of extinction. From the forests slipping away beneath the stealthy paws of the Florida panther, to the giant panda's plight to climb ever higher in the mountains of China in search of sustenance, to the brutal poaching tactics that have devastated Africa's rhinoceros and elephant populations, Corwin takes readers on a global tour to witness firsthand the critical state of our natural world. Along the way, he shares inspiring stories of battles being waged and won in defense of the earth's most threatened creatures by the conservationists on the front lines. These stories of hope and progress underscore an important message: Our own survival, as well as that of the world's wildlife, is in our hands. The race to save the planet's most endangered wildlife is under way. Every heartbeat matters.

100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go

100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go

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Told in a series of stylish, original essays, New York Times travel bestseller 100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go is for the serious Francophile and anyone who loves crisp stories well told. Like all great travel writing, this collection goes beyond the guidebook and offers insight not only about where to go but why to go there. Combining advice, memoir, and meditations on the glories of traveling through France, this book is the must-have for anyone--woman or man--voyaging to or just dreaming of France.

Award-winning writer Marcia DeSanctis draws on years of travels and life in France to lead you through vineyards, architectural treasures, fabled gardens, and contemplative hikes from Biarritz to Deauville, Antibes to the French Alps. These 100 entries capture art, history, food, fresh air, beaches, wine, and style and along the way, she tells the stories of many fascinating women who changed the country's destiny. Ride a white horse in the Camargue, seek iconic paintings of women in Paris, try thalassotherapy in St. Malo, shop for raspberries at Nice's Cour Saleya market--these and 96 other pleasures are rendered with singular style. The stories are sexy, literary, spiritual, profound, and overall, simply gorgeous. 100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go is an indispensable companion for the smart and curious love of France.

100 Places in Spain Every Woman Should Go

100 Places in Spain Every Woman Should Go

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Patricia Harris began visiting Spain shortly after the death of dictator Francisco Franco and has witnessed the country's renaissance in art, culture, and cuisine as it rejoined Europe. Drawing on three decades of intimate acquaintance with the country, she leads readers along twisting mountain roads, down to the docks of fishing villages, into the shoe outlets of Elche, and out to the muddy saffron fields of La Mancha. She takes you down city streets of Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla, and San Sebastian to dark flamenco clubs, sybaritic public baths, endlessly inventive tapas bars, design shops full of mantillas and fans, and into a brightly tiled chocolatería for hot chocolate and churros at 3 a.m. She explores the art from Velázquez to Picasso, architecture from the phantasmagorical vision of Antoni Gaudí's Sagrada Familia to the cool suspension spans of Santiago Calatrava. She tells the tales of some formidable Spanish women, from a fourth-century B.C. goddess to a queen who wrested Spain from the Moors, to the twenty-first-century winemakers who elevated Spain's Toro and Rueda onto the world stage. Literary, sexy, whimsical, and even spiritual, 100 Places in Spain Every Woman Should Go is for the smart and curious traveler who wants to see Spain, her way.
100 Places You Will Never Visit

100 Places You Will Never Visit

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Ever wondered what it takes to get into Fort Knox? Fancied a peek inside the Coca-Cola Safety Deposit Box? Would you dare to visit Three Mile Island?

The world is full of secret places that we either don't know about, or couldn't visit even if we wanted to. Now you can glimpse the Tora Bora caves in Afghanistan, visit the Tucson Titan Missile Site, tour the Vatican Archives, or see the Chapel of the Ark. This fascinating guide book takes a look at 100 places around the world that are either so hard to reach, so closely guarded, or so secret that they are virtually impossible to visit any other way.

100 Plus: How the Coming Age of Longevity Will Change Everything, from Careers and Relationships to Family and Faith

100 Plus: How the Coming Age of Longevity Will Change Everything, from Careers and Relationships to Family and Faith

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Humanity is on the cusp of an exciting longevity revolution. The first person to live to 150 years has probably already been born. What will your life look like when you live to be over 100? Will you be healthy? Will your marriage need a sunset clause? How long will you have to work? Will you finish one career at sixty-five only to go back to school to learn a new one? And then, will you be happily working for another sixty years? Maybe you'll be a parent to a newborn and a grandparent at the same time. Will the world become overpopulated? And how will living longer affect your finances, your family life, and your views on religion and the afterlife? In 100 Plus, futurist Sonia Arrison takes us on an eye-opening journey to the future at our doorsteps, where science and technology are beginning to radically change life as we know it. She introduces us to the people transforming our lives: the brilliant scientists and genius inventors and the billionaires who fund their work. The astonishing advances to extend our lives--and good health--are almost here. In the very near future fresh organs for transplants will be grown in laboratories, cloned stem cells will bring previously unstoppable diseases to their knees, and living past 100 will be the rule, not the exception. Sonia Arrison brings over a decade of experience researching and writing about cutting-edge advances in science and technology to 100 Plus, painting a vivid picture of a future that only recently seemed like science fiction, but now is very real. 100 Plus is the first book to give readers a comprehensive understanding of how life-extending discoveries will change our social and economic worlds. This illuminating and indispensable text will help us navigate the thrilling journey of life beyond 100 years.
100 Things Weve Lost to the Internet

100 Things Weve Lost to the Internet

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The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost.

"A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People

Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They're gone.

To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace--a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another's gaze from across the room. Even as we've gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared.

In one hundred glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace--from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy.

100 Things We've Lost to the Internet is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL.

100 Things You Will Never Do

100 Things You Will Never Do

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Ever fancied traveling through time? Taming a lion? Winning a Nobel Prize? Well, here's how to attempt all that and more. Daniel Smith--author of "100 Places You Will Never Visit-"-takes you on an entertaining journey through 100 things you will (probably) never get the chance to do.
Offering tips and advice on things that you may never be rich enough to do (buy your own island, drink a bottle of 1787 Chateau Lafite, own a Shakespeare first folio); things you might never be brave enough to try (bullfight, base jump from the Burj Khalifa, charm a snake); things you'll hopefully never have to do (escape from Alcatraz, land a 747, play Russian roulette); and even the downright absurd (being in two places at once, making gold, becoming invisible), "100 Things You Will Never Do" will give you a glimpse of your infinite potential."
100 Things Youre Not Supposed to Know

100 Things Youre Not Supposed to Know

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This book sheds light on those things that people in power--government, religious leaders, corporations, the rich and well connected--would just as soon wish you didn't know. To them secrets are power. And they'll do whatever it takes to keep them that way -- suppressing the truth and covering up facts that might make the rest of us angry enough to challenge the powerful or at least to have a good laugh at their expense.

Using careful research and impeccable sources, Kick uncovers the hidden truth. For example, self-appointed censors warn constantly about the dangers of pornography, but the fact is that pornography has existed since the first cave people carved dirty pictures on the walls. It's also true that two atomic bombs were dropped on North Carolina--although we managed to avoid nuking Greenland, Texas, Canada, Britain and Spain; George Washington embezzled government funds; 1 of 10 people is not fathered by the man they believe is dad; Barbie is based on a German sex doll; The American colonists practiced cannibalism, and much more.

This is a combined edition of 50 Things You're Not Supposed to Know, Volumes 1 and 2 first published in 2003 and 2004.

Paperback Fiction

Bedrock Faith
By: May, Eric Charles
Memorial
By: Washington, Bryan
Lying Life of Adults
By: Ferrante, Elena
Infinite Country
By: Engel, Patricia
You Feel It Just Below the Ribs
By: Matthewson, Janina
Hench
By: Walschots, Natalie Zina

Hardcover Non-Fiction

1000 Years of Joys and Sorrows
By: Ai Weiwei
Going There
By: Couric, Katie
Between the Lines
By: Beutter Cohen, Uli
David Copperfields History of Magic
By: Britland, David
Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity
By: Wengrow, David
Welcome to Dunder Mifflin
By: Silverman, Ben

Hardcover Fiction

Noor
Author: Okorafor, Nnedi
Little Hope
Author: Joella, Ethan
Chouette
Author: Oshetsky, Claire
Termination Shock
Author: Stephenson, Neal
Sentence
Author: Erdrich, Louise
All of Us Villains
Author: Herman, Christine Lynn