View your shopping cart.

Banner Message

Please note that online availability does not reflect stock in store!

Please check your SPAM folder for communications from us- for some reason our messages are being sent there more than usual :(

Thanksgiving Hours:
Wednesday 11/23: 10am-4pm
Thursday 11/24: CLOSED
Friday 11/25: 10am-6pm

Music

Waylon

Waylon

$27.00
More Info
"This book is a terrific tribute, from a son to his father."---Willie Nelson

"I'm so excited about Terry's new book."---Dolly Parton

From the Foreword by Ken Mansfield

"There are many stories about Waylon . . . the family man, the creative genius man, the quiet man, the king-of-the-six-day-roar-man, the uncommon man, the legendary man, the bad-ass man . . . they are all in this book."

In a signed copy of his autobiography, Texas-born country "Outlaw" icon Waylon Jennings penned a personal note to his son Terry: "I did my best. Now it's your turn." Two decades later, Terry Jennings finally completes the true story of his father's remarkable, unvarnished life with Waylon: Tales of My Outlaw Dad.

Born when Waylon was only nineteen, Terry came of age just as Waylon's career hit the stratosphere with hits like "I've Always Been Crazy" and "Good Hearted Woman," one of his famous Willie Nelson duets. Terry dropped out of high school and joined his dad on tour, and the two became more like brothers than father and son. On the road, they toured with legends like Nelson, Johnny Cash, Kris Kristofferson, and Jessi Colter, Waylon's fourth and final wife. Together father and son led a hard-partying lifestyle centered around music, women, and drugs.

Waylon's success--critical acclaim, bestselling albums, sold-out tours, and even TV stardom on The Dukes of Hazzard--was at times eclipsed by his demons, three divorces, crippling debt, and a depression that Terry traces to the premature death of Buddy Holly. (Waylon was supposed to be on Holly and Ritchie Valens's doomed flight.) Through it all, Terry worked on the touring crew, helped manage Waylon's career, and became one of his father's closest confidantes. Debunking myths and sharing incredible never-before-told stories, this book is a son's loving and strikingly honest portrait of his father, "the greatest Outlaw country musician to grace this earth" and an unlikely but devoted family man. Waylon: Tales of My Outlaw Dad will resonate for generations of fans.

Ways of Hearing

Ways of Hearing

$19.95
More Info
A writer-musician examines how the switch from analog to digital audio is changing our perceptions of time, space, love, money, and power.

Our voices carry farther than ever before, thanks to digital media. But how are they being heard? In this book, Damon Krukowski examines how the switch from analog to digital audio is changing our perceptions of time, space, love, money, and power. In Ways of Hearing--modeled on Ways of Seeing, John Berger's influential 1972 book on visual culture--Krukowski offers readers a set of tools for critical listening in the digital age. Just as Ways of Seeing began as a BBC television series, Ways of Hearing is based on a six-part podcast produced for the groundbreaking public radio podcast network Radiotopia. Inventive uses of text and design help bring the message beyond the range of earbuds.

Each chapter of Ways of Hearing explores a different aspect of listening in the digital age: time, space, love, money, and power. Digital time, for example, is designed for machines. When we trade broadcast for podcast, or analog for digital in the recording studio, we give up the opportunity to perceive time together through our media. On the street, we experience public space privately, as our headphones allow us to avoid "ear contact" with the city. Heard on a cell phone, our loved ones' voices are compressed, stripped of context by digital technology. Music has been dematerialized, no longer an object to be bought and sold. With recommendation algorithms and playlists, digital corporations have created a media universe that adapts to us, eliminating the pleasures of brick-and-mortar browsing. Krukowski lays out a choice: do we want a world enriched by the messiness of noise, or one that strives toward the purity of signal only?

We Are The Clash

We Are The Clash

$18.95
More Info

The Clash's final chapter, after guitarist Mick Jones' 1983 departure, has largely been forgotten--until this book, in which authors Mark Andersen and Ralph Heibutzki argue that the punk pioneers were still creating vital music to the very end.
--Rolling Stone, an RS Picks / New Books

A BookRiot Loved pick for July!

In We Are The Clash, Mark Andersen and Ralph Heibutzki...are more interested in Strummer's strain to re-harness the power of punk to ignite opposition in the cynical Thatcher-Reagan era.
--The Current's Rock and Roll Book Club (Minnesota Public Radio)

The Clash may have not been the best example of integrity in the music world with their careerist opportunism but their message of hope and possibility, cribbed from Reggae and Soul music, is all too important.
--Maximum Rocknroll

When you think of The Clash, what comes to mind? Their early days in the London punk scene, perhaps, or the triumphant release of London Calling. We Are The Clash focuses on a very different moment in the band's history: the point at which the group splintered in the early 1980s, and its members grappled with an onset of reactionary governments around the world.
--Vol. 1 Brooklyn, included in the July 2018 Book Preview

One of the most rewarding music books you'll come across this year...By focusing as much on the politics that motivated the Clash, We Are the Clash becomes a vital political history as much as an account of an underdocumented portion of a band's career. Great music books catalyze critical reconsiderations; We Are the Clash does one better, inviting readers to consider what matters to them: the creative commodities that artists produce? Or the ideals, however complexly and clumsily human they may be, that often compel artists to create in the first place.
--Johns Hopkins Magazine

A gripping tale of the band's struggle to reinvent itself as George Orwell's 1984 loomed. This bold campaign crashed headlong into a wall of internal contraditions and rising right-wing power.
--Brooklyn Digest (blog)

Given the number of books out there about The Clash, this is, as I stated, the only one to take a genuine, unbiased and in-depth appraisal of this era of the band. Given the quality of the writing, this could also be the most essential book about the band.
--Scanner Zine

The Clash was a paradox of revolutionary conviction, musical ambition, and commercial drive. We Are The Clash is a gripping tale of the band's struggle to reinvent itself as George Orwell's 1984 loomed. This bold campaign crashed headlong into a wall of internal contradictions, and rising right-wing power.

While the world teetered on the edge of the nuclear abyss, British miners waged a life-or-death strike, and tens of thousands died from US guns in Central America, Clash cofounders Joe Strummer, Paul Simonon, and Bernard Rhodes waged a desperate last stand after ejecting guitarist Mick Jones and drummer Topper Headon. The band shattered just as its controversial final album, Cut the Crap, was emerging.

Andersen and Heibutzki weave together extensive archival research and in-depth original interviews with virtually all of the key players involved to tell a moving story of idealism undone by human frailty amid a climatic turning point for our world

We Shall Overcome A Song That Changed the World With CD

We Shall Overcome A Song That Changed the World With CD

$18.00
More Info

"We Shall Overcome" isn't a complicated piece of music. The first verse has only twenty-two words, most of them repeated. The melody is straightforward. The chords are basic. Yet the song has had a profound effect on people throughout the United States--and the world.

In clear, accessible language Stuart Stotts explores the roots of the tune and the lyrics in traditional African music and Christian hymns. He demonstrates the key role "We Shall Overcome" played in the civil rights, labor, and anti-war movements in America. And he traces the song's transformation into an international anthem. With its dramatic stories and memorable quotes, this saga of a famous piece of music offers a unique way of looking at social history.
Author's note, bibliography, source notes, index.

We're Not Here to Entertain: Punk Rock, Ronald Reagan, and the Real Culture War of 1980s America

We're Not Here to Entertain: Punk Rock, Ronald Reagan, and the Real Culture War of 1980s America

$27.95
More Info
Many remember the 1980s as the era of Ronald Reagan, a conservative decade populated by preppies and yuppies dancing to a soundtrack of electronic synth pop music. In some ways, it was the MTV generation. However, the decade also produced some of the most creative works of punk culture, from
the music of bands like the Minutemen and the Dead Kennedys to avant-garde visual arts, literature, poetry, and film. In We're Not Here to Entertain, Kevin Mattson documents what Kurt Cobain once called a punk rock world --the all-encompassing hardcore-indie culture that incubated his own talent.
Mattson shows just how widespread the movement became--ranging across the nation, from D.C. through Ohio and Minnesota to LA--and how democratic it was due to its commitment to Do-It-Yourself (DIY) tactics.

Throughout, Mattson puts the movement into a wider context, locating it in a culture war that pitted a blossoming punk scene against the new president. Reagan's talk about end days and nuclear warfare generated panic; his tax cuts for the rich and simultaneous slashing of school lunch program
funding made punks, who saw themselves as underdogs, seethe at his meanness. The anger went deep, since punks saw Reagan as the country's entertainer-in-chief; his career, from radio to Hollywood and television, synched to the very world punks rejected. Through deep archival research, Mattson
reignites the heated debates that punk's opposition generated in that era-about everything from straight edge ethics to anarchism to the art of dissent. By reconstructing the world of punk, Mattson demonstrates that it was more than just a style of purple hair and torn jeans. In so doing, he
reminds readers of punk's importance and its challenge to simplistic assumptions about the 1980s as a one-dimensional, conservative epoch.

Weep Shudder Die

$20.00
More Info
Weird Al: Seriously

Weird Al: Seriously

$28.00
More Info
From his love of accordions and Hawaiian print shirts to his popular puns and trademark dance moves, "Weird Al" Yankovic has made a career out of making us laugh. Funny music is often dismissed as light and irrelevant, but Yankovic's fourteen successful studio albums prove there is more going on than comedic music's reputation suggests. In this book, for the first time, the parodies, original compositions, and polka medleys of the Weird Al universe finally receive their due respect. Lily Hirsch weaves together original interviews with the prince of parody himself, creating a fresh take on comedy and music's complicated romance. She reveals that Yankovic's jests have always had a deeper meaning, addressing such topics as bullying, celebrity, and racial and gender stereotypes. Weird Al is undeterred by those who say funny music is nothing but a low-brow pastime. And thank goodness. With his good-guy grace still intact, Yankovic remains unapologetically and unmistakably himself. Reveling in the mischief and wisdom of Yankovic's forty-year career, this book is an Al-expense-paid tour of a true comedic and musical genius.
WHAM George Michael and Me

WHAM George Michael and Me

$28.00
More Info
For the first time, Andrew Ridgeley--one half of one of the most famous bands in the world--tells the inside story of Wham!, his lifelong friendship with George Michael, and the formation of a band that changed the shape of the music scene in the early eighties.

In 1975 Andrew took a shy new boy at school under his wing. They instantly hit it off, and their boyhood escapades at Bushy Meads School built a bond that was never broken. The duo found themselves riding an astonishing roller coaster of success, taking them all over the world. They made and broke iconic records, they were treated like gods, but they stayed true to their friendship and ultimately to themselves. It was a party that seemed as if it would never end. And then it did, in front of tens of thousands of tearful fans at Wembley Stadium in 1986.

Andrew's memoir covers in wonderful detail those years, up until that last iconic concert: the scrapes, the laughs, the relationships, the good, and the bad. It's a unique and one-and-only time to remember that era, that band, and those boys.

What Else Is in the Teaches of Peaches

What Else Is in the Teaches of Peaches

$27.95
More Info
One of the Huffington Post's Best Art Books of 2015

[Peaches] has teamed up with her longtime tour photographer Holger Talinski to look back at a brazen career that has captured the attention of outsider artists and massive pop stars alike, ranging from Michael Stipe to PJ Harvey to Iggy Pop...Along with Holger's uncompromising, often raw imagery, the book includes stories from artists who have championed Peaches's work over the years.
--New York Times T Magazine

It takes a lot of grueling work to pull off what Peaches does so subversively night after night on tour and in theater productions. That's the takeaway from this revealing (and NSFW) photo book on the electro-pop provocateur, as seen through the lens of photographer Talinski and featuring essays by Michael Stipe, Yoko Ono, and [Elliot] Page.
--Boston Globe

Electronic musician and performance artist Peaches has made a career out of pushing boundaries, and her new book is equally transgressive. Photographer Holger Talinski captures the artist onstage and off in the outrageous costumes that have been a performance signature for her, and in quieter moments away from the strobe lights.
--San Francisco Chronicle

One flip through the glossy new monograph What Else Is In the Teaches of Peaches is all it takes to get absorbed into the post-punk wonderland of pop culture icon Peaches.
--W Magazine

Peaches is an attitude and a sensibility....She's iconic, and her iconography is important.
--The Globe and Mail

One of Loud and Quiet Magazine's Best Books of 2015

The bare-all book shows Peaches on and off stage, focusing on her efforts to shatter gender stereotypes, promote sex positivity, and push the boundaries of art and performance.
--Vice Magazine, The Creators Project

What Else Is in the Teaches of Peaches, a new book of photography, attempts to capture more: Peaches onstage, backstage, in her 30-boob breastplate, on the crapper, on a cross, passed out, convalescing, performing for Yoko Ono, curled up with family, recording with Iggy Pop. It's a groupie's delight.
--SF Weekly

For Peaches fans, the collection offers glimpses into both the public and private life of the artist who put feminist electroclash on the map. Peaches led the way, not only for other underground electronic acts like Le Tigre, Ladytron, and Chicks on Speed, but also artists that went on to major mainstream success. Would M.I.A. exist without Peaches? Lady Gaga? In her current iteration, Miley Cyrus?...In the end, [What Else Is in the Teaches of Peaches] is a reminder that Peaches, the artist and the musician...forged a vibrant, genre-bending career that continues to throb with spirit, transgression, energy, and ambition.
--KQED Arts

Perhaps what hits you most of all, maybe more than the striking costumes and occasional nudity, is how much fun Peaches' life appears to be. Less than halfway into the book, you start to trust the Peaches/Talinski collaborative union, and you somehow come to realise that it's all authentic, magic and reality. There's none of the staginess that you sometimes see in photo books of pop stars, particularly those who are led around by their egos.
--PopMatters

This volume presents a mesmerizing collection of Holger Talinski's evocative and sometimes erotic photos of transgressive musical icon Peaches, on and off stage, with accompanying text by Peaches, Michael Stipe (R.E.M.), Yoko Ono, and the actor Elliot Page, best known for their lead role in the film Juno, which garnered them an Oscar nomination.

What Is It All but Luminous

What Is It All but Luminous

$27.95
More Info
"Poetic musings on a life well-lived--one that is still moving forward, always creating, always luminous. This isn't your typical autobiography. Garfunkel's history is told in flowing prose, bounding from present to past, far from a linear rags-to-riches story."
--Bookreporter


"It's hard to imagine any single word that would accurately describe this book . . . an entertaining volume that's more fun to read than a conventional memoir might have been."
--The Wall Street Journal


"A charming book of prose and poetry printed in a digitalized version of his handwriting . . . witty, candid, and wildly imaginative . . . A highly intelligent man trying to make sense of his extraordinary life."
--Associated Press

From the golden-haired, curly-headed half of Simon & Garfunkel, a memoir (of sorts)--moving, lyrical impressions, interspersed throughout a narrative, punctuated by poetry, musings, lists of resonant books loved and admired, revealing a life and the making of a musician, that show us, as well, the evolution of a man, a portrait of a life-long friendship and of a collaboration that became the most successful singing duo in the roiling age that embraced, and was defined by, their pathfinding folk-rock music.

In What Is It All but Luminous, Art Garfunkel writes about growing up in the 1940s and '50s (son of a traveling salesman, listening as his father played Enrico Caruso records), a middle-class Jewish boy, living in a redbrick semi-attached house on Jewel Avenue in Kew Gardens, Queens.

He writes of meeting Paul Simon, the kid who made Art laugh (they met at their graduation play, Alice in Wonderland; Paul was the White Rabbit; Art, the Cheshire Cat). Of their being twelve at the birth of rock'n'roll ("it was rhythm and blues. It was black. I was captured and so was Paul"), of a demo of their song, Hey Schoolgirl for seven dollars and the actual record (with Paul's father on bass) going to #40 on the charts.

He writes about their becoming Simon & Garfunkel, ruling the pop charts from the age of sixteen, about not being a natural performer but more a thinker, an underground man.

He writes of the hit songs; touring; about being an actor working with directors Mike Nichols ("the greatest of them all"), about choosing music over a PhD in mathematics.

And he writes about his long-unfolding split with Paul, and how and why it evolved, and after; learning to perform on his own . . . and about being a husband, a father and much more.

What Is It All but Luminous

What Is It All but Luminous

$20.00
More Info
Poetic musings on a life well-lived--one that is still moving forward, always creating, always luminous. This isn't your typical autobiography. Garfunkel's history is told in flowing prose, bounding from present to past, far from a linear rags-to-riches story.
--Bookreporter


It's hard to imagine any single word that would accurately describe this book . . . an entertaining volume that's more fun to read than a conventional memoir might have been.
--The Wall Street Journal


A charming book of prose and poetry printed in a digitalized version of his handwriting . . . witty, candid, and wildly imaginative . . . A highly intelligent man trying to make sense of his extraordinary life.
--Associated Press

From the golden-haired, curly-headed half of Simon & Garfunkel, a memoir (of sorts)--moving, lyrical impressions, interspersed throughout a narrative, punctuated by poetry, musings, lists of resonant books loved and admired, revealing a life and the making of a musician, that show us, as well, the evolution of a man, a portrait of a life-long friendship and of a collaboration that became the most successful singing duo in the roiling age that embraced, and was defined by, their pathfinding folk-rock music.

In What Is It All but Luminous, Art Garfunkel writes about growing up in the 1940s and '50s (son of a traveling salesman, listening as his father played Enrico Caruso records), a middle-class Jewish boy, living in a redbrick semi-attached house on Jewel Avenue in Kew Gardens, Queens.

He writes of meeting Paul Simon, the kid who made Art laugh (they met at their graduation play, Alice in Wonderland; Paul was the White Rabbit; Art, the Cheshire Cat). Of their being twelve at the birth of rock'n'roll ("it was rhythm and blues. It was black. I was captured and so was Paul"), of a demo of their song, Hey Schoolgirl for seven dollars and the actual record (with Paul's father on bass) going to #40 on the charts.

He writes about their becoming Simon & Garfunkel, ruling the pop charts from the age of sixteen, about not being a natural performer but more a thinker, an underground man.

He writes of the hit songs; touring; about being an actor working with directors Mike Nichols ("the greatest of them all"), about choosing music over a PhD in mathematics.

And he writes about his long-unfolding split with Paul, and how and why it evolved, and after; learning to perform on his own . . . and about being a husband, a father and much more.

What They'll Never Tell You About the Music Business

What They'll Never Tell You About the Music Business

$19.99
More Info
"For someone on the way up, this book is a must; for everyone else, it's a bible."--Danny Strick, co-President, SonyATV Music Publishing, Inc.

This completely revised and expanded edition of What They'll Never Tell You About the Music Business is a must-have reference not only for aspiring songwriters, record producers, and performing artists but also for record company executives, personal and business managers, agents, and attorneys. You'll learn:

*How the Internet has affected every aspect of the music business, from copyright and royalty issues to censorship

*How many musicians have seized do-it-yourself Internet opportunities to create successful business models

*How satellite radio, digital jukeboxes, and video games are affecting the music market

*How artists can maximize their chances for long-term financial health

*How the royalty pie is sliced--and who gets the pieces

*What snares and pitfalls to avoid when signing an employment contract
*And much more.

"The music business is complicated, and this book is very helpful in deciphering its pitfalls, opportunities, and challenges."--Clive Davis, Chief Creative Officer, Sony Music Entertainment Worldwide

"Thall's book simplifies a complicated business, and it provides the reader with knowledge that otherwise is available only to those on the inside."--Scott Francis, President, Warner/Chappell Music and Chairman & CEO, Warner/Chappell Music U.S.

"Whoever reads this book is getting expert advice from one of the most respected and knowledgeable players in the music industry today. I wish this book was available when I was looking to begin my career in the music business."--David Renzer, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Universal Music Publishing Group

"Intelligent and accessible--rich in references, but easily understandable."--David Geffen

"A clear contender for the one indispensable work on the topic, this book delivers the goods. There is no one involved in the music business who will not learn and benefit from this ambitious work."--New York State Bar Association

What Theyll Never Tell You About the Music Business Third Edition

What Theyll Never Tell You About the Music Business Third Edition

$22.99
More Info
The completely revised and expanded edition of What They'll Never Tell You About the Music Business is a must-have reference. You'll learn:

- How many musicians have seized do-it-yourself internet opportunities to create successful business models,
- How the royalty pie is sliced--and who gets the pieces,
- How the fundamentals of music publishing, producing, managing, touring, and the record industry apply more than ever,
- Why this book is the indispensable guide to the worldwide music industry,
- How corporate general counsels can educate their employees (and themselves) to understand the strictures of copyright law and to avoid trouble,
- And much more.
What to Listen for in Music

What to Listen for in Music

$16.00
More Info
Now in trade paperback: "The definitive guide to musical enjoyment" (Forum).

In this fascinating analysis of how to listen to both contemporary and classical music analytically, eminent American composer Aaron Copland offers provocative suggestions that will bring readers a deeper appreciation of the most viscerally rewarding of all art forms.

What Would Keith Richards Do?

What Would Keith Richards Do?

$16.00
More Info

What is a wiseman? What is a prophet?

Someone with a strange, unflappable demeanor. Someone who speaks in cryptic koans, words whose meanings take years to unravel. Someone who has confronted death, God, sin, and the immortal soul. Someone unfit for this world, but too brilliant to depart it. Someone--in short--like Keith Richards.

Here, at last, the wisdom of this indefatigable man is recorded and set forth. These are his visionary words: I would rather be a legend than a dead legend. Or Whatever side I take, I know well that I will be blamed. And--indeed--I've never had a problem with drugs, only with policemen.

Not merely a compendium of wisdom, this book is also a complete guide to the inner workings of a complex and inspired belief system, and the life of a man sanctified by fame. What Would Keith Richards Do reminds us to learn from our mistakes, let our instincts lead us, and above all, do what Keith has done better than anyone--survive.

What You Want Is in the Limo

What You Want Is in the Limo

$26.00
More Info
An epic joyride through three history-making tours in 1973 that defined rock and roll superstardom the money, the access, the excess forevermore.
The Who s "Quadrophenia." Led Zeppelin s "Houses of the Holy." Alice Cooper s "Billion Dollar Babies." These three unprecedented tours and the albums that inspired them were the most ambitious of these artists careers, and they forever changed the landscape of rock and roll: the economics, the privileges, and the very essence of the concert experience. On these juggernauts, rock gods and their entourages were born, along with unimaginable overindulgence and the legendary flameouts. Tour buses were traded for private jets, arenas replaced theaters, and performances transmogrified into over-the-top, operatic spectacles. As the sixties ended and the seventies began, an altogether more cynical era took hold: peace, love, and understanding gave way to sex, drugs, and rock and roll.
But the decade didn t become the seventies, acclaimed journalist Michael Walker writes, until 1973, a historic and mind-bogglingly prolific year for rock and roll that saw the release of countless classic albums, from "The" "Dark Side of the Moon" to "Goat s Head Soup;" "Goodbye Yellow Brick Road;" "Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.; "and "The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle." Aerosmith, Queen, and Lynyrd Skynyrd released their debut albums. The Roxy and CBGB opened their doors. Every major act of the era from Fleetwood Mac to Black Sabbath was on the road that summer, but of them all, Walker writes, it was The Who, Led Zeppelin, and Alice Cooper who emerged as the game changers.
Walker revisits each of these three tours in memorable, all-access detail: he goes backstage, onto the jets, and into the limos, where every conceivable wish could be granted. He wedges himself into the sweaty throng of teenage fans (Walker himself was one of them) who suddenly were an economic force to be reckoned with, and he vividly describes how a decade s worth of decadence was squeezed into twelve heart-pounding, backbreaking, and rule-defying months that redefined, for our modern times, the business of superstardom.
Praise for "What You Want Is in the Limo"
""
Required reading . . . 1973 is a turning point in popular music the border between hippie-ethos 60s rock n roll and conspicuous-consumption excess 70s rock. "New York Post"
""
Loud and boisterous . . . Like a good vinyl-era single, it s over before it wears out its welcome. You may even want to flip it over and start again when you re finished. "Fort Worth Star-Telegram"
""
You don t have to love the music or personas of the three bands highlighted here . . . to appreciate the vital roles that all three played in creating the modern rock star. . . . [Walker] is convincing and entertaining in explaining why 1973 was a seminal year in rock. "The Daily Beast"
""
[There s] so much rock n' roll history packed inside. "GQ"
""
Very well written . . . It gives an intellectual immersion into these bands lives. "Led-Zeppelin.org"
""
[Walker] argues for [1973] as a tipping point, when big tours and bigger money became a defining ethos in rock music. "NPR""
When Broadway Went to Hollywood

When Broadway Went to Hollywood

$29.95
More Info
When films like The Jazz Singer started to integrate synchronized music, in the late 1920s many ambitious songwriting pioneers of the Great White Way - George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, and Lorenz Hart, among many others - were enticed westward by Hollywood studios'
promises of national exposure and top dollar success. But what happened when writers native to the business of Broadway ran into the very different business of Hollywood? Their movies had their producer despots, their stacking of writing teams on a single project, their use of five or six songs per
story where Broadway fit in a dozen, and it seemed as if everyone in Hollywood was uncomfortable with characters bursting into song on the street, in your living room, or in a cottage small by a waterfall.

Did the movies give theater writers a chance to expand their art, or did mass marketing ruin the musical's quintessential charm? Is it possible to trace the history of the musical through both stage and screen manifestations, or did Broadway and Hollywood give rise to two wholly irreconcilable art
forms? And, finally, did any New York writer or writing team create a film musical as enthralling and timeless as their work for the stage?

In When Broadway Went to Hollywood, writer and celebrated steward of musical theatre Ethan Mordden directs his unmistakable wit and whimsy to these challenging questions and more, charting the volatile and galvanizing influence of Broadway on Hollywood (and vice versa) throughout the twentieth
century. Along the way, he takes us behind the scenes of the great Hollywood musicals you've seen and loved (The Wizard of Oz, Gigi, The Sound of Music, Chicago, West Side Story, The Music Man, Grease) as well as some of the outrageous flops you probably haven't. The first book to tell the story of
how Broadway affected the Hollywood musical, When Broadway Goes to Hollywood is sure to thrill theatre buffs and movie lovers alike.

When Giants Walked the Earth

When Giants Walked the Earth

$17.99
More Info

The first significant fresh reporting on the legendary band in twenty years, built on interviews with all surviving band members and revealing a never-before-seen side of the genius and debauchery that defined their heyday.

Veteran rock journalist Mick Wall unflinchingly tells the story of the band that pushed the envelope on both creativity and excess, even by rock 'n' roll standards. Led Zeppelin was the last great band of the 1960s and the first great band of the 1970s--and When Giants Walked the Earth is the full, enthralling story of Zep from the inside, written by a former confidante of both Jimmy Page and Robert Plant. Rich and revealing, it bores into not only the disaster, addiction and death that haunted the band but also into the real relationship between Page and Plant, including how it was influenced by Page's interest in the occult. Comprehensive and yet intimately detailed, When Giants Walked the Earth literally gets into the principals' heads to bring to life both an unforgettable band and an unrepeatable slice of rock history.