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LGBTQIAA+

LGBTQ Book of Days - Revised 2019 Edition (2019)

LGBTQ Book of Days - Revised 2019 Edition (2019)

$20.00
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The LGBTQ Book of Days - 2019 Revised Edition is a reference book, a concise compilation of trivia, and a tool for further investigation into our rich, colorful, and often challenging past. Day after day, this comprehensive volume chronicles the unforgettable events and incredible lives that have forged our history and made us the strong, brave, and proud community we are today. The LGBTQ Book of Days - 2019 Revised Edition was written in appreciation of those who came before ... and as a reminder to those who will follow.

Lgbtq Comedic Monologues That Are Actually Funny

Lgbtq Comedic Monologues That Are Actually Funny

$14.99
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The first and only book of its kind, this cutting-edge and incredibly hysterical monologue book is specifically for actors auditioning for LGBTQ roles. LGBTQ Comedic Monologues That Are Actually Funny features works by LGBT writers and comics (and their allies) who have written and/or performed for Comedy Central, Backstage magazine, NBC, the Huffington Post, the Onion, Second City, E!, and many more. This collection is the go-to source for the comedic monologue needs of actors seeking LGBT material, as well as a paean to LGBT characters and artists.
Little Book of Pride: Quotes That Inspired 50 Years of Pride

Little Book of Pride: Quotes That Inspired 50 Years of Pride

$8.95
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50 years of Pride in the words of those who changed the world.

Half a century has passed since 2,000 people marched in the very first Pride march, in New York City. It was a moment when the LGBT+ community rose up against centuries of hatred and persecution, spawning a global movement and the Pride parades that now take place around the world.

The Little Book of Pride is a collection of quotes that captures the voices of those who have played a key part in the long journey to a place of Pride - from the very first pioneers, to those who took the fight into the streets of the Stonewall riots, and right up to today's movers and shakers.

'Your lives matter. Your voices matter. Your stories matter.' Actress and trans activist Laverne Cox at the Goldern Globes Awards, 2016.

'If a bullet should enter my brain, let that bullet destroy every closet door.' Tape recording left by Harvey Milk, the first openly gay US politician, murdered in 1978.

Love and Resistance

Love and Resistance

$24.95
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A ragtag group of women protesting behind a police line in the rain. A face in a crowd holding a sign that says, "Hi Mom, Guess What!" at a gay rights rally. Two lovers kissing under a tree. These indelible images are among the thousands housed in the New York Public Library's archive of photographs of 1960s and '70s LGBTQ history from photojournalists Kay Tobin Lahusen and Diana Davies. Lahusen is a pioneering photojournalist who captured pivotal moments in the LGBTQ civil rights movement. Davies, in turn, is one of the most important photojournalists who documented gay, lesbian, and trans liberation, as well as civil rights, feminist, and antiwar movements.

This powerful collection--which captures the energy, humor, and humanity of the groundbreaking protests that surrounded the Stonewall Riots--celebrates the diversity of this rights movement, both in the subjects of the photos and by presenting Lahusen and Davies' distinctive work and perspectives in conversation with each other. A preface, captions, and part introductions from curator Jason Baumann provide illuminating historical context. And an introduction from Roxane Gay, best-selling author of Hunger, speaks to the continued importance of these iconic photos of resistance.

M Word: Writers on Same-Sex Marriage

M Word: Writers on Same-Sex Marriage

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As it heads through the courts, dividing the nation and shaping the political landscape, the issue of same-sex marriage is becoming one of the major civil-rights battles of our generation. Now, some of the country's finest writers, gay and straight, explore the nuances of one of the most complicated issues of our time.

Drawing on personal experiences or culling from history, the headlines, or their own fertile imaginations, eleven noted writers present an all-too-human look at gay matrimony and its implications for marriage in general--and how our traditional marriages both influence and measure up to these new unions.

With essays by Francine Prose, on what would have happened if Oscar Wilde had married his lover; George Saunders, on the need to outlaw not only same-sex marriages but also samish-sex marriages; Dan Savage, on the supposed value of monogamy within marriage; Wendy Brenner, on giving her best friend away in a gay marriage; and many others. The M Word reminds us that marriage of any sort is an institution now ready for reexamination.

Magnus Hirschfeld: The Origins of the Gay Liberation Movement

Magnus Hirschfeld: The Origins of the Gay Liberation Movement

$23.00
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Magnus Hirschfeld (1868-1935) was one of the first great pioneers of the gay liberation movement. Revered by such gay icons as Christopher Isherwood and Harry Hay, founder of the Mattachine Society, Hirschfeld's legacy resonates throughout the twentieth-century and around the world. Guided by his motto "Through Science Toward Justice," Hirschfeld helped found the Scientific Humanitarian Committee in Germany to defend the rights of homosexuals and develop a scientific framework for sexual equality. He was also an early champion of women's rights, campaigning in the early 1900s for the decriminalization of abortion and the right of female teachers and civil servants to marry and have children. By 1933 Hirschfeld's commitment to sexual liberation made him a target for the Nazis, and they ransacked his Institute for Sexual Research and publicly burned his books.

This biography, first published to acclaim in Germany, follows Hirschfeld from his birth in the Prussian province of Pomerania to the heights of his career during the Weimar Republic and the rise of German fascism. Ralf Dose illuminates Hirschfeld's ground-breaking role in the gay liberation movement and explains some of his major theoretical concepts, which continue to influence our understanding of human sexuality and social justice today.

Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights

Making Gay History: The Half-Century Fight for Lesbian and Gay Equal Rights

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"Rich and often moving . . . at times shocking, but often enlightening and inspiring: oral history at its most potent and rewarding." -- Kirkus Reviews

A completely revised and updated edition of the classic volume of oral history interviews with high-profile leaders and little-known participants in the gay rights movement that cumulatively provides a powerful documentary look at the struggle for gay rights in America.

From the Boy Scouts and the U.S. military to marriage and adoption, the gay civil rights movement has exploded on the national stage. Eric Marcus takes us back in time to the earliest days of that struggle in a newly revised and thoroughly updated edition of Making History, originally published in 1992. Using the heartfelt stories of more than sixty people, he carries us through a compelling five-decade battle that has changed the fabric of American society.

The rich tapestry that emerges from Making Gay History includes the inspiring voices of teenagers and grandparents, journalists and housewives, from the little-known Dr. Evelyn Hooker and Morty Manford to former vice president Al Gore, Ellen DeGeneres, and Abigail Van Buren. Together, these many stories bear witness to a time of astonishing change, as queer people have struggled against prejudice and fought for equal rights under the law.

Men without Maps

Men without Maps

$27.50
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For many men of various sexual inclinations, the Second World War offered an unprecedented release from the constraints of civilian life. However, when they returned home they had to face the harsh realities of a restrictive society. Men Without Maps continues the story of these men, whom John Ibson first gave voice to in The Mourning After. Here he uncovers the experiences of men after World War II who had same-sex desires but few, if any, direct, affirmative models of how to build identities and relationships. Though heterosexual men had plenty of cultural maps--provided by their parents, social institutions, and nearly every engine of popular culture--in the years before Pride parades, social organizations for queer persons, or publications devoted to them, gay men lacked such guides. In his survey of the years from shortly before the war up to the gay rights movement of the late 1960s and early '70s, Ibson considers male couples, who balanced domestic contentment with exterior repression, as well as single men, whose solitary lives illuminate unexplored aspects of the queer experience. Men Without Maps shows how, in spite of the obstacles they faced, midcentury gay men found ways to assemble their lives and senses of self at a time of limited social acceptance.
Motion of Light in Water

Motion of Light in Water

$19.95
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Samuel Delany is a science fiction writer, teacher and recipient of the William Whitehead Memorial Award for a lifetime's contribution to lesbian and gay culture. His autobiography focuses on his life in New York's lower east side in the 1960s and his development as a black gay writer in an open interracial marriage. The original edition, published
My Husband Betty

My Husband Betty

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Author Helen Boyd is a happily married woman whose husband enjoys sharing her wardrobe - and she has written the first book on transgendered men to focus on their relationships. Traditionally known as cross-dressers, transvestites, or drag queens, men like Helen's husband are a diverse lot who don't always conform to stereotype. Helen addresses every imaginable question concerning the probable and improbable reasons for behavior that still baffle not only "mental health professionals" but the practitioners themselves; the taxonomy of the transgendered and the distinct but overlapping societies of each group; coming out; bisexuality, and homophobia.
My New Gender Workbook: A Step-By-Step Guide to Achieving World Peace Through Gender Anarchy and Sex Positivity

My New Gender Workbook: A Step-By-Step Guide to Achieving World Peace Through Gender Anarchy and Sex Positivity

$48.95
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This updated edition of Bornstein's formative My Gender Workbook (1997) provides an invigorating introduction to contemporary theory around gender, sexuality, and power. The original is a classic of modern transgender theory and literature and, alongside Bornstein's other work, has influenced an entire generation of trans writers and artists. This revised and expanded edition extends that legacy, offering an accessible foundation for examining gender in the reader's life and in the broader culture while arguing for the dismantling of all forms of oppression. For fans of the original, Bornstein's new material merits a fresh read...--Publishers Weekly, starred review

Cultural theorists have written loads of smart but difficult-to-fathom texts on gender theory, but most fail to provide a hands-on, accessible guide for those trying to sort out their own sexual identities. In My Gender Workbook, transgender activist Kate Bornstein brings theory down to Earth and provides a practical approach to living with or without a gender.

Bornstein starts from the premise that there are not just two genders performed in today's world, but countless genders lumped under the two-gender framework. Using a unique, deceptively simple and always entertaining workbook format, complete with quizzes, exercises, and puzzles, Bornstein gently but firmly guides readers toward discovering their own unique gender identity.

Since its first publication in 1997, My Gender Workbook has been challenging, encouraging, questioning, and helping those trying to figure out how to become a real man, a real woman, or something else entirely. In this exciting new edition of her classic text, Bornstein re-examines gender in light of issues like race, class, sexuality, and language. With new quizzes, new puzzles, new exercises, and plenty of Kate's playful and provocative style, My New Gender Workbook promises to help a new generation create their own unique place on the gender spectrum.

My Thinning Years

My Thinning Years

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Jon Derek Croteau brings a heady mixture of raw emotion, pathos, and humor to his powerful journey from self-hatred and punishment to self-affirmation and healing as a gay man in My Thinning Years.

As a child, Jon tried desperately to be his father's version of the all-American boy, denying his gayness in a futile attempt to earn the love and respect of an abusive man. With this he built a deep, internalized homophobia that made him want to disappear rather than live with the truth about himself. That denial played out in the forms of anorexia, bulimia, and obsessive running, which consumed him as an adolescent and young adult.It wasn't until a grueling yet transformative Outward Bound experience that Jon began to face his sexual identity. This exploration continued as he entered college and started the serious work of sorting through years of repressed anger to separate from his father's control and condemnation.My Thinning Years is an inspiring story of courage, creativity, and the will to live--and of recreating the definition of family to include friends, relatives, and teachers who support you in realizing your true self.In 1996, Jon wrote a song dreaming about finding a love and being able to live openly and freely. The song lyrics are in My Thinning Years and he recorded the song this summer with Broadway great Miguel Cervantes for others to hear. The song is available on iTunes and Spotify and profits will benefit The Trevor Project.

No Place Like Home

No Place Like Home

$29.95
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Finalist: Lambda Literary Award for LBGTQ Nonfiction

Winner: Stubbendieck Great Plains Distinguished Book Prize

A Kansas Notable Book

Far from the coastal centers of culture and politics, Kansas stands at the very center of American stereotypes about red states. In the American imagination, it is a place LGBT people leave. No Place Like Home is about why they stay. The book tells the epic story of how a few disorganized and politically naïve Kansans, realizing they were unfairly under attack, rolled up their sleeves, went looking for fights, and ended up making friends in one of the country's most hostile states.

The LGBT civil rights movement's history in California and in big cities such as New York and Washington, DC, has been well documented. But what is it like for LGBT activists in a place like Kansas, where they face much stiffer headwinds? How do they win hearts and minds in the shadow of the Westboro Baptist Church (̶Christian" motto: "God Hates Fags")? Traveling the state in search of answers--from city to suburb to farm--journalist C. J. Janovy encounters LGBT activists who have fought, in ways big and small, for the acceptance and respect of their neighbors, their communities, and their government. Her book tells the story of these twenty-first-century citizen activists--the issues that unite them, the actions they take, and the personal and larger consequences of their efforts, however successful they might be.

With its close-up view of the lives and work behind LGBT activism in Kansas, No Place Like Home fills a prairie-sized gap in the narrative of civil rights in America. The book also looks forward, as an inspiring guide for progressives concerned about the future of any vilified minority in an increasingly polarized nation.

No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from Lgbt Kansas

No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from Lgbt Kansas

$21.95
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Finalist: Lambda Literary Award for LBGTQ Nonfiction

Winner: Stubbendieck Great Plains Distinguished Book Prize

A Kansas Notable Book

Far from the coastal centers of culture and politics, Kansas stands at the very center of American stereotypes about red states. In the American imagination, it is a place LGBT people leave. No Place Like Home is about why they stay. The book tells the epic story of how a few disorganized and politically naïve Kansans, realizing they were unfairly under attack, rolled up their sleeves, went looking for fights, and ended up making friends in one of the country's most hostile states.

The LGBT civil rights movement's history in California and in big cities such as New York and Washington, DC, has been well documented. But what is it like for LGBT activists in a place like Kansas, where they face much stiffer headwinds? How do they win hearts and minds in the shadow of the Westboro Baptist Church (̶Christian" motto: "God Hates Fags")? Traveling the state in search of answers--from city to suburb to farm--journalist C. J. Janovy encounters LGBT activists who have fought, in ways big and small, for the acceptance and respect of their neighbors, their communities, and their government. Her book tells the story of these twenty-first-century citizen activists--the issues that unite them, the actions they take, and the personal and larger consequences of their efforts, however successful they might be.

With its close-up view of the lives and work behind LGBT activism in Kansas, No Place Like Home fills a prairie-sized gap in the narrative of civil rights in America. The book also looks forward, as an inspiring guide for progressives concerned about the future of any vilified minority in an increasingly polarized nation.

None of the Above: Reflections on Life Beyond the Binary

None of the Above: Reflections on Life Beyond the Binary

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A "humane and heart-rending" memoir exploring what it means to live outside the normative boundaries imposed by society, from an award-winning trans writer and performer (The Guardian).In None of the Above: Reflections on Life Beyond the Binary, Travis Alabanza considers seven phrases people have directed at them throughout their life. These phrases--some deceptively innocuous, some deliberately loaded or violent, some celebratory--have fundamentally shaped Alabanza, both for better and for worse. But these phrases also illuminate broader issues about a world that insists on gender as a fixed identity.Alabanza considers the meaning of gender, and the role it plays in a world that rigidly and aggressively enforces the binary. Drawing from their experiences as racialized queer person, Alabanza deftly interrogates our current frameworks around identity with nuance, openness, and humor. The result is a meditation on doubt and language that turns a mirror back on society, and on ourselves. By heralding transformative futures, None of the Above questions what we think we know--and shares new ways that we might live.
Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America

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As Lillian Faderman writes, there are "no constants with regard to lesbianism," except that lesbians prefer women. In this groundbreaking book, she reclaims the history of lesbian life in twentieth-century America, tracing the evolution of lesbian identity and subcultures from early networks to more recent diverse lifestyles. She draws from journals, unpublished manuscripts, songs, media accounts, novels, medical literature, pop culture artifacts, and oral histories by lesbians of all ages and backgrounds, uncovering a narrative of uncommon depth and originality.
On Being Different

On Being Different

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The groundbreaking work on being homosexual in America--available again only from Penguin Classics and with a new foreword by Dan Savage

Originally published in 1971, Merle Miller's On Being Different is a pioneering and thought-provoking book about being homosexual in the United States. Just two years after the Stonewall riots, Miller wrote a poignant essay for the New York Times Magazine entitled "What It Means To Be a Homosexual" in response to a homophobic article published in Harper's Magazine. Described as "the most widely read and discussed essay of the decade," it carried the seed that would blossom into On Being Different--one of the earliest memoirs to affirm the importance of coming out.

For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

One Teacher in Ten in the New Millennium

One Teacher in Ten in the New Millennium

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Twenty completely new stories of negotiating the triumphs and challenges of being an LGBT educator in the twenty-first century

For more than twenty years, the One Teacher in Ten series has served as an invaluable source of strength and inspiration for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender educators. This all-new edition brings together stories from across America--and around the world--resulting in a rich tapestry of varied experiences. From a teacher who feels he must remain closeted in the comparative safety of New York City public schools to teachers who are out in places as far afield as South Africa and China, the teachers and school administrators in One Teacher in Ten in the New Millennium prove that LGBT educators are as diverse and complex as humanity itself. Voices largely absent from the first two editions--including transgender people, people of color, teachers working in rural districts, and educators from outside the United States--feature prominently in this new collection, providing a fuller and deeper understanding of the triumphs and challenges of being an LGBT teacher today.