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History

999

999

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A Pen America Literary Award Finalist
A Goodreads Choice Awards Nominee

An Amazon Best of the Year Selection

The untold story of some of WW2's most hidden figures and the heartbreaking tragedy that unites them all. Readers of Born Survivors and A Train Near Magdeburg will devour the tragic tale of the first 999 women in Auschwitz concentration camp. This is the hauntingly resonant true story that everyone should know.

On March 25, 1942, nearly a thousand young, unmarried Jewish women boarded a train in Poprad, Slovakia. Filled with a sense of adventure and national pride, they left their parents' homes wearing their best clothes and confidently waving good-bye. Believing they were going to work in a factory for a few months, they were eager to report for government service. Instead, the young women--many of them teenagers--were sent to Auschwitz. Their government paid 500 Reich Marks (about $200) apiece for the Nazis to take them as slave labor. Of those 999 innocent deportees, only a few would survive.

The facts of the first official Jewish transport to Auschwitz are little known, yet profoundly relevant today. These were not resistance fighters or prisoners of war. There were no men among them. Sent to almost certain death, the young women were powerless and insignificant not only because they were Jewish--but also because they were female. Now acclaimed author Heather Dune Macadam reveals their poignant stories, drawing on extensive interviews with survivors, and consulting with historians, witnesses, and relatives of those first deportees to create an important addition to Holocaust literature and women's history.

Includes a foreword by Caroline Moorehead, NYT bestselling author of A Train in Winter!

"A fresh, remarkable story of Auschwitz on the 75th anniversary of its liberation. An uplifting story of the herculean strength of young girls in a staggeringly harrowing situation."
--Kirkus

"Intimate, harrowing... This careful, sympathetic history illuminates an incomprehensible human tragedy."
--Publishers Weekly

999 : A History of Chicago in Ten Stories

999 : A History of Chicago in Ten Stories

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The story of 999 is the story of Chicago at one of the most pivotal and explosive moments in its history. Set along the city's storied lakefront, the author details the wealth, greed, power, corruption and even murder that accompanied the rise of arguably the most beautiful and historic residence ever built in Chicago. It sits on land that at one time was mostly under water, the site of a war over ownership that raged in courtrooms for 68 years. This is also the story of the building's residents--a range of personalities, passions, flaws and accomplishments--that will have you marveling at 999's broad engagement with American History.
A History of Civilization in 50 Disasters

A History of Civilization in 50 Disasters

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Civilization rearranges nature for human convenience. Clothes and houses keep us warm; agriculture feeds us; medicine fights our diseases. It all works--most of the time. But key resources lie in the most hazardous places, so we choose to live on river flood plains, on the slopes of volcanoes, at the edge of the sea, above seismic faults. We pack ourselves into cities, Petri dishes for germs. Civilization thrives on the edge of disaster. And what happens when natural forces meet molasses holding tanks, insecticides, deepwater oil rigs, nuclear power plants? We learn the hard way how to avoid the last disaster--and maybe how to create the next one. What we don't know can, indeed, hurt us. This book's white-knuckled journey from antiquity to the present leads us to wonder at times how humankind has survived. And yet, as Author Gale Eaton makes clear, civilization has advanced not just in spite of disasters but in part because of them. Hats off to human resilience, ingenuity, and perseverance! They've carried us this far; may they continue to do so into our ever-hazardous future.

The History in 50 series explores history by telling thematically linked stories. Each book includes 50 illustrated narrative accounts of people and events--some well-known, others often overlooked--that, together, build a rich connect the-dots mosaic and challenge conventional assumptions about how history unfolds.

  • Dedicated to the premise that history is the greatest story ever told.
  • Includes a mix of "greatest hits" with quirky, surprising, provocative accounts.
  • Challenges readers to think and engage.
  • Includes a glossary of technical terms; sources by chapter; teaching resources as jumping-off points for student research; and endnotes.
  • Fountas & Pinnell Level Z+
  • A History of Medieval Europe: From Constantine to Saint Louis

    A History of Medieval Europe: From Constantine to Saint Louis

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    R.C. Davis provided the classic account of the European medieval world; equipping generations of undergraduate and 'A' level students with sufficient grasp of the period to debate diverse historical perspectives and reputations. His book has been important grounding for both modernists required to take a course in medieval history, and those who seek to specialise in the medieval period.

    In updating this classic work to a third edition, the additional author now enables students to see history in action; the diverse viewpoints and important research that has been undertaken since Davis' second edition, and progressed historical understanding. Each of Davis original chapters now concludes with a 'new directions and developments' section by Professor RI Moore, Emeritus of Newcastle University.

    A key work updated in a method that both enhances subject understanding and sets important research in its wider context. A vital resource, now up-to-date for generations of historians to come.

    A.J. Liebling: World War II Writings

    A.J. Liebling: World War II Writings

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    One of the most gifted and influential American journalists of the 20th century, A. J. Liebling spent five years reporting the dramatic events and myriad individual stories of World War II. As a correspondent for The New Yorker, Liebling wrote with a passionate commitment to Allied victory, an unfailing attention to telling details, and an appreciation for the literary challenges presented by the discursive, centrifugal, both repetitive and disparate nature of war. This volume brings together three books along with 26 uncollected New Yorker pieces and two excerpts from The Republic of Silence (1947), Liebling's collection of writing from the French Resistance.

    The Road Back to Paris (1944) narrates Liebling's experiences from September 1939 to March 1943, including his shock at the fall of France and dismay at isolationist indifference in the United States; it contains classic accounts of a winter voyage on a Norwegian tanker during the Battle of the Atlantic, visits to front-line airfields in North Africa, and the defeat of a veteran panzer division by American troops in Tunisia. Mollie and Other War Pieces (1964) brings together Liebling's portrait of a legendary nonconformist American soldier in North Africa with his eyewitness account of Omaha Beach on D-Day, evocative reports from Normandy, and investigation of a German atrocity in rural France. In Normandy Revisited (1958) Liebling writes about his return to France in 1955 and recalls the joyous liberation of his beloved Paris while exploring with bittersweet perception how wartime experience is transformed into memory. The selection of uncollected New Yorker pieces includes a profile of an RAF ace, surveys of the French underground press, and an encounter with a captured collaborator in Brittany, as well as postwar reflections on battle fatigue, Ernie Pyle, and the writing of military history.

    With maps and chronology.

    LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.

    Aaronsohn's maps

    Aaronsohn's maps

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    Scientist, diplomat, and spy, Aaron Aaronsohn was one of the most extraordinary figures in the early struggle to create a homeland for the Jews, as revealed in this new biography by the author of Making the World Safe for Tourism.
    Abe

    Abe

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    Now an Apple TV+ documentary, Lincoln's Dilemma, airing February 18, 2022.

    One of the Wall Street Journal's Ten Best Books of the Year

    A Washington Post Notable Book A Christian Science Monitor and Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2020

    Winner of the Gilder Lehrman Abraham Lincoln Prize and the Abraham Lincoln Institute Book Award

    A marvelous cultural biography that captures Lincoln in all his historical fullness. . . . using popular culture in this way, to fill out the context surrounding Lincoln, is what makes Mr. Reynolds's biography so different and so compelling . . . Where did the sympathy and compassion expressed in [Lincoln's] Second Inaugural--'With malice toward none; with charity for all'--come from? This big, wonderful book provides the richest cultural context to explain that, and everything else, about Lincoln. --Gordon Wood, Wall Street Journal

    From one of the great historians of nineteenth-century America, a revelatory and enthralling new biography of Lincoln, many years in the making, that brings him to life within his turbulent age

    David S. Reynolds, author of the Bancroft Prize-winning cultural biography of Walt Whitman and many other iconic works of nineteenth century American history, understands the currents in which Abraham Lincoln swam as well as anyone alive. His magisterial biography Abe is the product of full-body immersion into the riotous tumult of American life in the decades before the Civil War.

    It was a country growing up and being pulled apart at the same time, with a democratic popular culture that reflected the country's contradictions. Lincoln's lineage was considered auspicious by Emerson, Whitman, and others who prophesied that a new man from the West would emerge to balance North and South. From New England Puritan stock on his father's side and Virginia Cavalier gentry on his mother's, Lincoln was linked by blood to the central conflict of the age. And an enduring theme of his life, Reynolds shows, was his genius for striking a balance between opposing forces. Lacking formal schooling but with an unquenchable thirst for self-improvement, Lincoln had a talent for wrestling and bawdy jokes that made him popular with his peers, even as his appetite for poetry and prodigious gifts for memorization set him apart from them through his childhood, his years as a lawyer, and his entrance into politics.

    No one can transcend the limitations of their time, and Lincoln was no exception. But what emerges from Reynolds's masterful reckoning is a man who at each stage in his life managed to arrive at a broader view of things than all but his most enlightened peers. As a politician, he moved too slowly for some and too swiftly for many, but he always pushed toward justice while keeping the whole nation in mind. Abe culminates, of course, in the Civil War, the defining test of Lincoln and his beloved country. Reynolds shows us the extraordinary range of cultural knowledge Lincoln drew from as he shaped a vision of true union, transforming, in Martin Luther King Jr.'s words, the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.

    Abraham Lincoln did not come out of nowhere. But if he was shaped by his times, he also managed at his life's fateful hour to shape them to an extent few could have foreseen. Ultimately, this is the great drama that astonishes us still, and that Abe brings to fresh and vivid life. The measure of that life will always be part of our American education.

    Abigail and John

    Abigail and John

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    "Fascinating...Gelles has provided a balanced portrait, and her mastery of the period's issues and history is evident on every page. Her treatment of the family... [is] written with understanding and sensitivity... But it is her strength as a feminist historian that makes her treatment of Abigail the most gripping... masterful and captivating."
    -- Washington Times

    "A landmark... Well-organized and expertly composed, the book is an impressive addition to the nation's written history."
    -- Oklahoma City Oklahoman

    Readers who enjoyed Doris Kearns Goodwin's No Ordinary Time, Cokie Roberts's Founding Mothers, and David McCullough's John Adams will love "this eminently readable... charming and sensitive, yet candid and unflinching joint biography" (Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848) of America's original "power couple" Abigail and John Adams.

    Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage

    Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage

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    Married in 1764, Abigail and John Adams worked side by side for a decade, raising a family while John became one of the most prosperous, respected lawyers in Massachusetts. When his duties as a statesman and diplomat during the Revolutionary War expanded, Abigail and John endured lengthy separations. But their loyalty and love remained strong, as their passionate, forthright letters attest. It's in this correspondence that Abigail comes into her own as an independent woman. It's also in these exchanges that we learn about the familial tragedies that tested them: the early deaths of their son Charles from alcoholism and their daughter Nabby from breast cancer.

    As much a romance as it is a lively chapter in early American history, Abigail and John is an inspirational portrait of a couple who endured the turmoil and trials of a revolution, and in so doing paved the way for the birth of a nation.

    About Time

    About Time

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    For thousands of years, people of all cultures have made and used clocks, from the city sundials of ancient Rome to the medieval water clocks of imperial China, hourglasses fomenting revolution in the Middle Ages, the Stock Exchange clock of Amsterdam in 1611, Enlightenment observatories in India, and the high-precision clocks circling the Earth on a fleet of GPS satellites that have been launched since 1978. Clocks have helped us navigate the world and build empires, and have even taken us to the brink of destruction. Elites have used them to wield power, make money, govern citizens, and control lives--and sometimes the people have used them to fight back.

    Through the stories of twelve clocks, About Time brings pivotal moments from the past vividly to life. Historian and lifelong clock enthusiast David Rooney takes us from the unveiling of al-Jazari's castle clock in 1206, in present-day Turkey; to the Cape of Good Hope observatory at the southern tip of Africa, where nineteenth-century British government astronomers moved the gears of empire with a time ball and a gun; to the burial of a plutonium clock now sealed beneath a public park in Osaka, where it will keep time for 5,000 years.

    Rooney shows, through these artifacts, how time has been imagined, politicized, and weaponized over the centuries--and how it might bring peace. Ultimately, he writes, the technical history of horology is only the start of the story. A history of clocks is a history of civilization.

    About Time

    About Time

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    For thousands of years, people of all cultures have made and used clocks, from the city sundials of ancient Rome to the medieval water clocks of imperial China, hourglasses fomenting revolution in the Middle Ages, the Stock Exchange clock of Amsterdam in 1611, Enlightenment observatories in India, and the high-precision clocks circling the Earth on a fleet of GPS satellites that have been launched since 1978. Clocks have helped us navigate the world and build empires, and have even taken us to the brink of destruction. Elites have used them to wield power, make money, govern citizens, and control lives--and sometimes the people have used them to fight back.

    Through the stories of twelve clocks, About Time brings pivotal moments from the past vividly to life. Historian and lifelong clock enthusiast David Rooney takes us from the unveiling of al-Jazari's castle clock in 1206, in present-day Turkey; to the Cape of Good Hope observatory at the southern tip of Africa, where nineteenth-century British government astronomers moved the gears of empire with a time ball and a gun; to the burial of a plutonium clock now sealed beneath a public park in Osaka, where it will keep time for 5,000 years.

    Rooney shows, through these artifacts, how time has been imagined, politicized, and weaponized over the centuries--and how it might bring peace. Ultimately, he writes, the technical history of horology is only the start of the story. A history of clocks is a history of civilization.

    Abraham Lincoln

    Abraham Lincoln

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    The sixteenth president of the United States was an exceptionally astute politician who has left a compelling story and legacy that continues to intrigue scholars and historians today. He led the nation through its greatest constitutional, military, and moral crisis--the Civil War. Inside the luxurious padded cover of Abraham Lincoln, discover removable facsimiles of rare documents of historic importance. Inside a fascinating political journey, explore his life in the White House from 1861-65, learn more about the Gettysburg Address and why it has been the most quoted speech throughout U.S. history, and finally read the details surrounding his assassination in 1865.

    Luxurious padded cover reminds readers that extra care has been taken to produce this exceptional work of literary art. Perfect for scholars, historians, and any home library. Abraham Lincoln is a terrific compilation and resource about one of the nation's most powerful men.

    Abraham LIncoln and White America

    Abraham LIncoln and White America

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    As "Savior of the Union" and the "Great Emancipator," Abraham Lincoln has been lauded for his courage, wisdom, and moral fiber. Yet Frederick Douglass's assertion that Lincoln was the "white man's president" has been used by some detractors as proof of his fundamentally racist character. Viewed objectively, Lincoln was a white man's president by virtue of his own whiteness and that of the culture that produced him. Until now, however, historians have rarely explored just what this means for our understanding of the man and his actions.

    Writing at the vanguard of "whiteness studies," Brian Dirck considers Lincoln as a typical American white man of his time who bore the multiple assumptions, prejudices, and limitations of his own racial identity. He shows us a Lincoln less willing or able to transcend those limitations than his more heroic persona might suggest but also contends that Lincoln's understanding and approach to racial bigotry was more enlightened than those of most of his white contemporaries.

    Blazing a new trail in Lincoln studies, Dirck reveals that Lincoln was well aware of and sympathetic to white fears, especially that of descending into "white trash," a notion that gnawed at a man eager to distance himself from his own coarse origins. But he also shows that after Lincoln crossed the Rubicon of black emancipation, he continued to grow beyond such cultural constraints, as seen in his seven recorded encounters with nonwhites.

    Dirck probes more deeply into what "white" meant in Lincoln's time and what it meant to Lincoln himself, and from this perspective he proposes a new understanding of how Lincoln viewed whiteness as a distinct racial category that influenced his policies. As Dirck ably demonstrates, Lincoln rose far enough above the confines of his culture to accomplish deeds still worthy of our admiration, and he calls for a more critically informed admiration of Lincoln that allows us to celebrate his considerable accomplishments while simultaneously recognizing his limitations.

    When Douglass observed that Lincoln was the white man's president, he may not have intended it as a serious analytical category. But, as Dirck shows, perhaps we should do so--the better to understand not just the Lincoln presidency, but the man himself.

    Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Illustrated

    Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Illustrated

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    Originally published in 1965 by Jack E. Levin, father of bestselling author Mark R. Levin, Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Illustrated is a beautifully designed and produced edition of Lincoln's powerful words, accompanied by historic photographs and illustrations from the Civil War and featuring the original Foreword by Jack E. Levin and a new Preface by his son.

    "Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal."

    Long before his conservative manifesto Liberty and Tyranny became a #1 New York Times bestseller, Mark R. Levin's love for his country was instilled in him by his father, Jack E. Levin. At family dinners, Jack would share his bountiful knowledge of American history and, especially, the inspiration of Abraham Lincoln.

    The son of immigrants, Jack Levin is an American patriot who responded with deep personal emotion to Lincoln's call for liberty and equality. His admiration for the great Civil War president inspired him to personally design and produce a beautiful volume, enhanced with period illustrations and striking battlefield images by Matthew Brady and other renowned photographers of the era, that brings to life the words of Lincoln's awe-inspiring response to one of the Civil War's costliest conflicts.

    Now Jack Levin's loving homage to the spirit of American freedom is available in an essential edition that features his original foreword as well as a touching new preface by his son, Mark Levin. In this way, Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address Illustrated celebrates the passing of patriotic pride and historical insight from generation to generation, from father to son.

    The day following the dedication of the National Soldier's Cemetery at Gettysburg, Edward Everett, who spoke before Lincoln, sent him a note saying: "Permit me to express my great admiration for the thoughts expressed by you, with such eloquent simplicity and appropriateness, at the consecration of the cemetery. I should be glad, if I could flatter myself that I came as near to the central idea of the occasion, in two hours, as you did in two minutes."

    Lincoln wrote back to Everett: "In our respective parts yesterday, you could not have been excused to make a short address, nor I a long one. I am pleased to know that in your judgement the little I did say was not entirely a failure."

    Abrahma Geiger and the Jewish Jesus

    Abrahma Geiger and the Jewish Jesus

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    Was Jesus the founder of Christianity or a teacher of Judaism? When he argued the latter based on the New Testament, Abraham Geiger ignited an intense debate that began in nineteenth-century Germany but continues to this day.

    Geiger, a pioneer of Reform Judaism and a founder of Jewish studies, developed a Jewish version of Christian origins. He contended that Jesus was a member of the Pharisees, a progressive and liberalizing group within first-century Judaism, and that he taught nothing new or original. This argument enraged German Protestant theologians, some of whom produced a tragic counterargument based on racial theory.

    In this fascinating book, Susannah Heschel traces the genesis of Geiger's argument and examines the reaction to it within Christian theology. She concludes that Geiger initiated an intellectual revolt by the colonized against the colonizer, an attempt not to assimilate into Christianity by adopting Jesus as a Jew, but to overthrow Christian intellectual hegemony by claiming that Christianity--and all of Western civilization--was the product of Judaism.

    Absence of Closure

    Absence of Closure

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    Absence of Closure by Gustav Schonfeld is an incredible memoir torn from the pages of history. Written in clear, forceful prose, this amazing story begins in Czechoslovakia, when Schonfeld was a boy and the Nazis came to power. A survivor of the concentration camps, with half of his relatives dead, Schonfeld came to the United States and struggled to create a new life. Although he became a doctor, married and had children, he couldn't forget the horrors of the past and began to chronicle his life on paper. Deeply moving and heartfelt, Absence of Closure reveals the bravery and heroism of a wrongly despised people, the love of a son for his father, and the burning need to survive. But more than that, Schonfeld stresses that remembrance is essential so that Nazi atrocities might never happen again. A stunning historical record and a gripping memoir of a remarkable man, Absence of Closure is also an important new work in Holocaust literature.
    Absolute Monarchs

    Absolute Monarchs

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    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

    In a chronicle that captures nearly two thousand years of inspiration and intrigue, John Julius Norwich recounts in riveting detail the histories of the most significant popes and what they meant politically, culturally, and socially to Rome and to the world. Norwich presents such popes as Innocent I, who in the fifth century successfully negotiated with Alaric the Goth, an invader civil authorities could not defeat; Leo I, who two decades later tamed (and perhaps paid off) Attila the Hun; the infamous "pornocracy"--the five libertines who were descendants or lovers of Marozia, debauched daughter of one of Rome's most powerful families; Pope Paul III, "the greatest pontiff of the sixteenth century," who reinterpreted the Church's teaching and discipline; John XXIII, who in five short years starting in 1958 instituted reforms that led to Vatican II; and Benedict XVI, who is coping with today's global priest sex scandal. Epic and compelling, Absolute Monarchs is an enthralling history from "an enchanting and satisfying raconteur" (The Washington Post).

    Absolute Monarchs: A History of the Papa

    Absolute Monarchs: A History of the Papa

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    Critical praise for ABSOLUTE MONARCHS
    ""Absolute Monarchs" sprawls across Europe and the Levant, over two millenniums, and with an impossibly immense cast: 265 popes, feral hordes of Vandals, Huns and Visigoths, expansionist emperors, Byzantine intriguers, Borgias and Medicis, heretic zealots, conspiring clerics, bestial inquisitors and more. Norwich manages to organize this crowded stage and produce a rollicking narrative. He keeps things moving at nearly beach-read pace."
    --Bill Keller, "New York Times" Book Review, Cover review
    "Renowned historian Norwich offers a rollicking account of the men who held the papal office, their shortcomings and their virtues, and the impact of the papacy on world history. He conducts us masterfully on a tour of the lives of the popes from Peter to Benedict XVI. . . . Entertaining and deeply researched, Norwich's history offers a wonderful introduction to papal lives."
    --Publishers Weekly
    "Historian, travel writer, and television documentarian Norwich presents an excellent, often surprising history of that 2,000-year-old institution....he focuses on political history as he traces the evolution of the papacy as an institution, while at the same time providing entertaining profiles of the most historically significant popes....An outstanding historical survey."
    --Booklist
    "When Norwich writes, I read; this member of the House of Lords is a notable and engrossing historian, perhaps best known for his monumental study of Byzantium. Here he offers a history of the nearly two-millennia-old papacy that should be popular with many readers."
    --Library Journal
    "A spirited, concise chronicle of the accomplishments of the most noteworthy popes. . . . Norwich doesn't skirt controversies, ancient and present, in this broad, clear-eyed assessment."
    --Kirkus Reviews
    A SWEEPING CHRONICLE OF ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT--AND CONTROVERSIAL--INSTITUTIONS IN HISTORY
    With the papacy embattled in recent years, it is essential to have the perspective of one of the world's most accomplished historians. In "Absolute Monarchs," John Julius Norwich captures nearly two thousand years of inspiration and devotion, intrigue and scandal. The men (and maybe one woman) who have held this position of infallible power over millions have ranged from heroes to rogues, admirably wise to utterly decadent. Norwich, who knew two popes and had private audiences with two others, recounts in riveting detail the histories of the most significant popes and what they meant politically, culturally, and socially to Rome and to the world.
    Norwich presents such brave popes as Innocent I, who in the fifth century successfully negotiated with Alaric the Goth, an invader civil authorities could not defeat, and Leo I, who two decades later tamed (and perhaps paid off) Attila the Hun. Here, too, are the scandalous figures: Pope Joan, the mythic woman said (without any substantiation) to have been elected in 855, and the infamous "pornocracy," the five libertines who were descendants or lovers of Marozia, debauched daughter of one of Rome's most powerful families.
    "Absolute Monarchs" brilliantly portrays reformers such as Pope Paul III, "the greatest pontiff of the sixteenth century," who reinterpreted the Church's teaching and discipline, and John XXIII, who in five short years starting in 1958 "opened up the church to the twentieth century," instituting reforms that led to Vatican II. Norwich brings the story to the present day with Benedict XVI, who is coping with a global priest sex scandal.
    Epic and compelling, "Absolute Monarchs" is the astonishing story of some of history's most revered and reviled figures, men who still cast light and shadows on the Vatican and the world today.