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Did you know Chicago is home to absolute scads of wonderful authors? We here at The Book Cellar love supporting local, and here you can find books written by your fellow Chicagoans in addition to titles that'll teach you The Windy City has a richer history than you'd even guess!

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Chicago Books!

Capone May Go Free

$24.95
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Carl Sandburg - Selected Poems

Carl Sandburg - Selected Poems

$16.00
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"What Sandburg knew and said was what America knew from the beginning and said from the beginning and has not yet, no matter what is believed of her, forgotten how to say, " wrote Archibald MacLeish about Carl Sandburg - that most American of poets - and his connection to the American psyche. This new collection of Sandburg's poetry, which includes four previously unpublished Lincoln poems, contains selections from all of Sandburg's previous volumes and certainly supports MacLeish's confidence in the breadth of Sandburg's scope. In more than 150 poems, arranged in eleven sections - from Chicago to Poems of Protest to Lincoln to Anti-War Poems to Poet of the People - readers can see what Sandburg was made of and, in turn, what the poet thought the American people were made of. Sandburg's aim was to write "simple poems... which continue to have an appeal for simple people, " and throughout his life the poet strove to maintain that important connection. The Hendricks, in a thoughtful and comprehensive introduction, discuss how Sandburg's life and beliefs colored his work and why that work resonates with Americans today.
Carless in Chicago

Carless in Chicago

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Survive and Thrive Car-Free in the Windy City

Imagine living in Chicago with more money in your pocket, a smaller bulge around your middle, and less stress about getting from point A to B.

Whether you're an autoholic or a motorphobic, carless by choice or carless by circumstance, a savvy native or adventurous visitor, Carless in Chicago is the indispensable reference and guide to enjoying the city without that money-eating, gas-guzzling, smog-emiting two-ton monkey on your back.

Carless in Chicago isn't merely a survival guide for the car-free; it provides a roadmap to all the personal, financial, health, and environmental benefits to kicking your car (or even just your second car) to the curb.

With the tools and techniques for going carless; information on navigating Chicago by foot, bike, CTA, Metra, and even by car when nothing else will do; and a fun, informative guide to Chicago by L.

Carson's: The History of a Chicago Shopping Landmark

Carson's: The History of a Chicago Shopping Landmark

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Carson Pirie Scott and Company always enjoyed a sterling reputation in Chicago, even among the merchant princes of State Street. For more than one hundred years, in architect Louis Sullivan's stunning commercial masterpiece, Carson's stood shoulder to shoulder with retail icon Marshall Field's, establishing itself as an anchor of contemporary style. It was a place that brought the world to the Midwest, from Parisian fashion to the authentic ambiance of the Mediterrenea dance numbers and the Santa's Village displays. Relive the friendly shopping experience that has kept the Carson's name alive for over a century and a half.

Cast of Shadows

$13.95
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Century of Progress

Century of Progress

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Drawn from the Chicago Tribune's vast archives, A Century of Progress is a collection of rare--and in many cases, previously unseen--photographs that document the Century of Progress International Exposition, the world's fair held in Chicago from 1933 to 1934. Conceived during the Roaring Twenties and born during the Great Depression, this sprawling event celebrated the city's centennial with industrial and scientific displays, lascivious entertainment, and a touch of unadulterated bad taste.

During this time, more than 48 million visitors flocked to Chicago's lakefront (the present site of McCormick Place and Northerly Island) to experience what turned out to be one of the most expansive displays of technological advancement and cultural diversity that took place in the 20th century. Featuring a fascinating introduction by Tribune reporter and historian Ron Grossman, this book documents the numerous facets of the exposition, from whimsical attractions, architectural triumphs, and scientific achievements to the occasionally insensitive and racist exhibits of differing cultures.

At a time when the entire U.S. population numbered just over 125 million people, this world's fair left an indelible mark on the collective consciousness of American culture, and A Century of Progress captures that feeling through its historic photographs. These images are invaluable witness to a civic milestone that forever after was honored by the fourth star on Chicago's flag.

Century of Progress: Chicago's 1933 World's Fair

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Chain O' Lakes

Chain O' Lakes

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The Chain O' Lakes has been one of Chicago's premier vacation spots since the 1880s. Witness its rich history in this collection of vintage postcards.


The nine major lake basins that make up the Chain O' Lakes region - Catherine, Channel, Grass, Bluff, Marie, Fox, Nippersink, Petite, and Pistakee - are all connected by the Fox River waterway and have, for over 100 years, been northern Illinois's leading destination for inland boaters, fishermen, picnickers, or those just hoping to relax and play at the beach. Luxurious mansions and swank resorts once dotted the more than 6,000 acres of shoreline. Many are gone today; some remain but have been vastly changed, but none are forgotten.

Captured here in over 200 vintage postcards are scenes from the chain's heyday, scenes that will seem at once faraway and familiar to the water-skiers, windsurfers, and other outdoor recreationists who populate the Chain O' Lakes today.

Challenging Chicago: Coping with Everyday Life, 1837-1920

Challenging Chicago: Coping with Everyday Life, 1837-1920

$21.95
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During an unprecedented period of rapid growth, the burgeoning metropolis of Chicago quickly became a concentration of risk. Through vignettes and real-life stories, this work reveals lower and middle-class peoples' strategies for coping with technology, crowding, anonymity, and other urban ills.

Changing Chicago

$40.00
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Changing Face of Public History

Changing Face of Public History

$22.00
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Spurred first by the civil rights debates of the 1960s and 1970s, then by the culture wars of the following decades, the Chicago Historical Society (CHS) increasingly sought to give visitors and patrons a voice in retelling the city's history. In response to debates over the authority to interpret the past, CHS engaged in community outreach and sponsored multicultural exhibits and programs. Yet, in this analysis of the society's evolving relationship with its diverse constituencies, Catherine M. Lewis finds that prevailing assumptions about the museum as a commemorative site dedicated to civic pride undermined CHS's bold attempts to create a public forum.

Based on more than 250 interviews with staff at CHS and museums around the country, as well as research into formerly inaccessible public and private papers, The Changing Face of Public History offers a behind-the-scenes look at the ways in which one of the most innovative museums in the United States has continually grappled with issues confronting not only museum professionals but all those concerned about the role history plays in the lives of American citizens.

Cheap Bastard's Guide to Chicago

Cheap Bastard's Guide to Chicago

$14.95
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Longtime Chicagoan Nadia Oehlsen reveals her secrets for living the good life cheaply in the Windy City, including how to enjoy free concerts, movies, comedy acts, and magic shows, where to get free food and wine (including Sunday brunch on the house), information on free days at museums and the Shedd Aquarium, the lowdown on Chicago's TV tapings and live shows, and much more.
Cheap Chow Chicago

Cheap Chow Chicago

$11.95
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Eat well, eat diversely, and eat economically! 'Cheap Chow Chicago', newly updated and even more gastronomically encompassing, shows just where to find the perfect delectable edible according to cuisine, neighbourhood, price, time of day, and state of mind. From late night to Latin, bountiful brunches to barbecue, and all you can eat to Asian; full of insightful reviews, tips about the tastiest and cheapest treats, and snippets of local lore; this book is a must for the Chicago shoestring gourmand. This third edition includes three indexes organised by name, neighbourhood, and type of cuisine, as well as more in-depth editorials of featured restaurants.

Cheeseland

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Chicago

Chicago

$22.00
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Chicago has been called the "most American of cities" and the "great American city." Not the biggest or the most powerful, nor the richest, prettiest, or best, but the most American. How did it become that? And what does it even mean? At its heart, Chicago is America's great hub. And in this book, Chicago magazine editor and longtime Chicagoan Whet Moser draws on Chicago's social, urban, cultural, and often scandalous history to reveal how the city of stinky onions grew into the great American metropolis it is today.

Chicago began as a trading post, which grew into a market for goods from the west, sprouting the still-largest rail hub in America. As people began to trade virtual representations of those goods--futures--the city became a hub of finance and law. And as academics studied the city's growth and its economy, it became a hub of intellect, where the University of Chicago's pioneering sociologists shaped how cities at home and abroad understood themselves. Looking inward, Moser explores how Chicago thinks of itself, too, tracing the development of and current changes in its neighborhoods. From Boystown to Chinatown, Edgewater to Englewood, the Ukrainian Village to Little Village, Chicago is famous for them--and infamous for the segregation between them.

With insight sure to enlighten both residents and anyone lucky enough to visit the City of Big Shoulders, Moser offers an informed local's perspective on everything from Chicago's enduring paradoxes to tips on its most interesting sights and best eats. An affectionate, beautifully illustrated urban portrait, his book takes us from the very beginnings of Chicago as an idea--a vision in the minds of the region's first explorers--to the global city it has become.

Chicago

Chicago

$39.95
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Chicago has never had a photo book of its own. Until now.

The city has produced some of the most important photographers of our time--Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, Art Shay--but has never before possessed a book packed with their most timeless work. This is the finest collection of its kind--more than 100 stunning images by the city's most revered photographers that show the enduring and endearing aspects of Chicago and its landscape from the Loop to the city's vast array of neighborhoods.

Richard Cahan and Michael Williams, the foremost picture editors of the city, curate the book. Here they have chosen photos going back more than a century to show a city that is both well-known and surprising. This is a book for people who love Chicago and for visitors who want something special to remember her by. It is filled with classic photographs that defy time--timeless pictures of a changing city.

Chicago

Chicago

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On the last day of summer, some years ago, a young college graduate moves to Chicago and rents a small apartment on the north side of the city, by the vast and muscular lake. This is the story of the five seasons he lives there, during which he meets gangsters, gamblers, policemen, a brave and garrulous bus driver, a cricket player, a librettist, his first girlfriend, a shy apartment manager, and many other riveting souls, not to mention a wise and personable dog of indeterminate breed.

A love letter to Chicago, the Great American City, and a wry account of a young man's coming-of-age during the one summer in White Sox history when they had the best outfield in baseball, Brian Doyle's Chicago is a novel that will plunge you into a city you will never forget, and may well wish to visit for the rest of your days.

Chicago

Chicago

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From Harvey- and Eisner-nominated cartoonist and editor Glenn Head comes Chicago, the hilarious and harrowing tale of a nineteen-year-old virgin who drops out of everything and into the unknown. Abandoning suburbia for art school and then the gritty streets, young Glenn finds himself fending off predators and fighting depression. A visit to Playboy offers entrée into the world of underground comix and R. Crumb, but it's a chance encounter with Muhammad Ali that allows young Glenn to prove his mettle. Like Scorsese circa Mean Streets crossed with revealing autobiography like Jim Carroll's The Basketball Diaries, Chicago is an unforgettable tale of losing one's mind, finding one's identity, and discovering love where it's least expected.